Kayaking is for the Birds

Against the backdrop of downtown Austin, a Double-crested Cormorant tolerates my presence at Lou Neff Point on Lady Bird Lake.

Against the backdrop of the tall buildings of downtown Austin, a Double-crested Cormorant tolerates my presence at Lou Neff Point on Lady Bird Lake.

Every November, I start watching for the arrival of Double-crested Cormorants to Austin’s Lady Bird Lake. On the occasional stroll around the lake’s hike and bike trail, I thrill at seeing the cormorants dry their wings while perched high in bald cypress trees at the water’s edge. From a variety of vantage points along the trail, I love watching these big, athletic birds ride the small swells in the middle of the lake and then dramatically plunge beneath the surface.

When driving across any one of the lake’s bridges at dusk, I crane my neck, watching for the trademark, almost V-shaped formations of cormorants flying home for the night to their tall-tree roosts. The cormorants’ wings beat impossibly fast, as if the birds are competing in a race that can never be won.

I thanked this cormorant for giving me several different views.

From my kayak, I thanked this cormorant for giving me several different views at Lou Neff Point on Lady Bird Lake.

For me, the cormorants signal a solemn change of season; a time of reflection and pause. My heart plunges to a familiar melancholy depth when the first cormorants arrive. Strong swimmers, they survive by diving for fish. Otherworldly in appearance, the cormorants lend a prehistoric feel to Lady Bird Lake during their winter stay.

I recently tried photographing cormorants from the hike and bike trail. I was not successful. I realized I had to get closer: I had to get on the water, with the birds. So this past Friday, on January 15, I rented a kayak from the Texas Rowing Center on Lady Bird Lake, determined to sidle up beside cormorants and other birds and wildlife on the water.

Considering this was only my second time in a kayak (my timid maiden voyage came on a summer day several years ago at the Texas Rowing Center), I was nervous for me, and for anyone else on the water.

Grappling with my camera gear, worried about a bum knee, and horrified at the very real possibility of unceremoniously dunking myself in the lake, I slid on my butt from the wooden dock into my one-person kayak. To the stoically quiet employee who assisted me: Thank you for not laughing. At least not in front of me. Fortunately, save for a mother and daughter who pushed off in a double kayak from the Texas Rowing Center dock just moments after my departure, the late-morning lake was largely void of human activity.

The beautiful Bufflehead duck winters on Lady Bird Lake.

The beautiful Bufflehead duck winters on Lady Bird Lake.

The American Coot is a familiar sight on Lady Bird Lake.

The American Coot is a familiar sight on Lady Bird Lake.

More than two hours later, riding the calm lake alongside cormorants, American Coots, and a wide variety of ducks including scaups and Buffleheads, I had forgotten to be afraid.

I wasn’t graceful, but the lightweight kayak was. The slender boat allowed me access into many a tight spot.

A pair of Lesser Scaups accompanied me for a short stretch on Lady Bird Lake.

A pair of scaups accompanied me for a short stretch of paddling on Lady Bird Lake.

Red-eared Slider turtles ignore the bumping of my kayak into shoreline bramble.

Red-eared Slider turtles ignore the bumping of my kayak into marsh-like shoreline bramble.

 

 

Time and again, as I skirted the shoreline, edging up next to egrets and turtles, the latter strung out on small limbs like beads on a necklace, the forgiving kayak got me out of jams. I banged the boat’s nose into low-hanging branches. I scraped tree roots. I hung up on the lake’s gravelly bottom in shallow water. But with the kayak’s double-bladed paddle I found easy to use, I learned to push myself back into deep water.

This high-stepping egret deftly navigated the same shallow-water muck I was trying to avoid.

This high-stepping Snow Egret deftly navigated the same shallow-water muck I was trying to avoid.

 

I learned, sort of, how to stop the kayak, or at least slow my progress long enough to get better views of wildlife lingering at the water’s edge as I drifted past.

For me, Wood Ducks — male Wood Ducks, that is, as seen at left — are the Painted Buntings of the water. They’re stunningly gorgeous.

For me, Wood Ducks — male Wood Ducks, that is, as seen at left — are the Painted Buntings of the water. They’re stunningly gorgeous.

I learned that reclusive Wood Ducks don’t take kindly to clumsy kayakers coming up on them, especially at much too fast a pace.

Suddenly, I had come much too close in my kayak for this female Wood Duck’s comfort.

Suddenly, my kayak had come much too close for this female Wood Duck’s comfort.

 

I learned, from two fishermen on a small boat, below, that the bass were biting.

I’ve always wondered what kind of fish live in Lady Bird Lake. These two fishermen happily told me of one species: bass.

I’ve always wondered what kind of fish live in Lady Bird Lake. These fishermen happily told me of one species: bass.

I observed, at the corner of Lou Neff Point, that cormorants sunning themselves on low-slung limbs will let you take lots and lots of pictures as long as you don’t come too close — say three feet while cradling the kayak paddle in your lap, grasping a branch knob with your left hand, and somehow holding and focusing the camera with your right. For sure, that scenario is enough to make any cormorant, such as the one that tolerated me for a good 10 minutes, flee the branch for the safety of the water.

Weary of my close-up photography, this Lou Neff Point cormorant finally took to the water.

Weary of my close-up photography, this cormorant finally took to the water beside Lady Bird Lake’s Lou Neff Point.

I can’t wait to go kayaking again on Lady Bird Lake. I’m eager to learn how to step into the kayak, with the elegant confidence of an egret, instead of sliding in on my behind. I can’t wait to gently rock on the water in the middle of the lake, paddle resting on my lap, as I watch the wild, wild life fly, and swim, all around me.

Lady Bird Lake has its share of unusual birds: This swan pedal boat seemingly came out of nowhere beneath the Ann W. Richards Congress Avenue Bridge.

Austin’s Lady Bird Lake has its share of unusual birds — real and man-made: While I was kayaking, this swan pedal boat seemingly came out of nowhere beneath the South First Street Bridge.

7 thoughts on “Kayaking is for the Birds

  1. 1smartlight

    Camille,

    So that’s where our Cormorants went! We lose them in November at my lake here in Northern Virginia. I’ve been kayaking/birding for a couple years now after a very long hiatus and share your feelings about it. I was out on the lake Sunday (40 degrees) with my daughter and we saw our nesting pair of Bald Eagles and two of our Great Blue Herons.

    It’s 14 degrees now so I might have to wait a bit before I get back out. I’m a bit worried that this will cause the Herons to head your way too.

    I would attach a couple pics but WordPress doesn’t allow it.

    Enjoy,

    Bob Parks

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. cwheels62 Post author

      Well, hi there, Bob! Great to hear from you! I’d love to see some of your pictures. What’s the name of the lake you frequent? Man, 14 degrees … that’s hard to imagine here in balmy Austin, Texas.

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      Reply
      1. 1smartlight

        It’s called Lake Burke and it’s a convenient 2 miles from the house. It was 9 degrees last night and going down to 15 tonight. They’re also calling for 2 feet of snow Friday…

        Here’s a link to a album of pics of wildlife on the lake.

        Cheers,

        Bob

        Like

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